Author Archives: CollegeWeekLive

44 Colleges You Probably Never Heard of, But Should! by Kristen Moon

Most people can name 20-30 colleges off the top of their head. There are over 4,000 universities worldwide. I want to introduce you to 44 universities you may not have heard of. If you are looking for great liberal arts colleges to apply to, you should definitely check out CTCL (Colleges That Change Lives). CTCL is a non-profit organization. Visit their website at You can also check out the book at your local library; the author is Loren Pope. The book is a great resource to flip through and view universities by location. Their member institutions are a perfect fit for students looking for a challenging academic curriculum with more hands-on experience in their undergraduate environment.

  1. What does CTCL do as an organization? – Their main goal is to educate students, counselors and family members about colleges that they might not have heard of. Their process is more informed, streamlined and introspective. They are strong advocates for the liberal arts and all their member schools are known for their quality liberal arts programs.
  2. How are the colleges selected? – The late Loren Pope, who was responsible for the list believed that the residential liberal arts experience is the ideal way for college students to learn. As of 2016, CTCL has 44 member schools that are all part of a non-profit organization interested in working together with students and parents to educate them about the liberal arts college scene.
  3. Who are the ideal candidates for the CTCL member institutions? – Any student who is looking for a college experience that includes extensive interaction with the faculty members will be best served by the CTCL schools. Since the class sizes are small, the faculty members act as mentors and not just advisers. Small schools create an excellent intellectual space in which the students get to live and learn. They are challenged, supported and they get to interact with a diverse group of both domestic and international students.
  4. Do they ever drop or add colleges? – No school has yet been removed from the organization. If the school is no longer able to offer a strong liberal arts program or change their educational system and admission process and make it less student-centered, they would no longer fit with the organization and their message. Colleges can be added if they follow the founding principles.
  5. Where can I learn more about CTCL? – If you want to know more about CTCL and its attendant institutions, visit their website. You can also follow them on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtag #CTCLColleges. They post regular updates on their specially curated tours for parents and students across the nation. They also have a lot of smaller events in which the executive director of the organization talks more about CTCL and the process of the college

College Spotlight

Agnes Scott College – 1889, Decatur, GA 

This Presbyterian-founded, women-only liberal arts college, with its current student population of 914, nonetheless boasts some impressive distinctions. Renamed in 1906 in honor of the mother of a magnanimous benefactor, Col. George Washington Scott, this is “the first institution of higher learning in Georgia to receive regional accreditation.” Since 1920 Agnes Scott has been in the top 10% of American colleges whose student complete their Ph.D. degrees. Agnes Scott is also listed among 2018’s Best Colleges’ National Liberal Arts Colleges.

This particular institution has a rich and fascinating history, more than can adequately be conveyed in this little summary. It is also ranked NCAA Division III – U.S. South, and one of their guiding philosophies is to operate on the Honor System, which trusts the integrity and best judgement of each individual. I would strongly recommend learning more about this enchanting and well-respected college.


Cornell College – 1853, Mount Vernon, IA

This institution, often confused with Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, even includes a page on their website which proudly states “We’re Not In Ithaca”. Cornell College also has a proud history, and their picturesque campus is on the National Registry of Historical Places. Cornell should be considered a pioneer in human rights: in 1858 it was the first college “West of the Mississippi” to award a degree to a woman, and a few years later to give equal pay to a female faculty member. In 1870 Cornell declared that “color and race shall not be considered a basis of qualification in the admission of students”.

Cornell College also has a very unique curriculum, introduced in 1978: “One Course At A Time”, wherein students attend one intensive, complete course for 3.5 weeks before moving on to another course.

Other notable facts about this college include Cornellians being regular recipients of Fulbright Scholarships, and their annual “Eyes of the World” multicultural show. Also, Mount Vernon, Iowa is among Arthur Frommer’s “America’s Coolest Small Towns”. Frommer is known for the magazine Budget Travel.


Ohio Wesleyan University – 1842, Delaware, OH 

This institution has perhaps the most unusual and storied history of these few spotlights: it had its beginning in a repurposed old hotel building, the purchase of which was essentially crowdfunded by the townspeople – for $10,000 in that time. Now many of their sites are also listed on the National Registry of Historical Places.

A phrase from their website which captivated me was the school’s offering of an “all-you-can-experience buffet” for those with a passion “for life and learning”. There are too many amazing facets to this university that I cannot possibly touch upon everything here; please do yourself a favor and check out this school, particularly if you have zeal for international issues. A distinguishing feature of Wesleyan is the Global Scholars Program, the motto of which is “Think Big, Go Global, and Get Real”. Described as a “competitive” program for “high-achieving first year students”, once accepted, these students retain that designation for their four years, and those upperclassmen who maintain the required high standards throughout their time have the opportunity to earn a $2000 theory-to-practice grant, specifically intended to fund “an approved international research or study project of their choice”.

A few more impressive factoids about Wesleyann: their Selby Stadium is the fourth largest privately-owned Division III stadium in the country, according to their website. Forbes has listed Wesleyann among their “Most Entrepreneurial Colleges”. I truly want to tell you more about this remarkable university, but we have to move on. Be sure to read about their three objectives which constitute a success for their students.


Guilford College – 1837, Greensboro, NC

Guilford still operates by the Core Values adopted by its Quaker founders. These guiding Values are: Community, Diversity, Equality, Excellence, Integrity, Justice, and Stewardship.

This college has been a member of CTCL for 21 years. Guilford offers 41 majors and 52 minors, and 83% of their graduates are employed within their first year after leaving, which is 15% higher than the national average. Their teacher-to-student is an incredible 1:1, and this institution was included in the 2016 Fiske Guide to Colleges as a “Best Buy”.

Discussing Stewardship and Diversity, Princeton designates Guilford as a “green” college, the grounds of Guilford were once part of the Underground Railroad, and 40% of the incoming 2020 class are students of color. Guilford adds yet another notable history to CTCL’s list, and their website displays “Your 4-1-0 Guarantee: Four Years, One Tuition, No Worries”.


Southwestern University – 1840, Georgetown, TX

Southwestern claims to be the second school West of the Mississippi to offer coeducation (after Agnes Scott, see above). A self-descriptor which immediately caught my attention is: “Education for Tomorrow: Creating the 21st Century Thinker”. Once again I’m unable to cram all of the compelling facts about this school into a few paragraphs.

Just one example of this is their annual Shilling Lecture Series: this year’s speaker was Jonathan Haidt, a prominent social psychologist and author of the NY Times Bestseller The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided By Politics And Religion. His lecture was “The Age of Outrage: What It Is Doing To Our Universities, and Our Country”. If that is not captivating enough, past speakers include conservationist Jane Goodall, former U.S. Senator Bill Bradley, anti-death penalty activist and author Sister Helen Prejean, former Secretary of State James Baker III, Former Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and our 39th POTUS, Jimmy Carter. This is to name only a few.

The bottom line is that CTCL colleges are student focused learning institutions. The member colleges challenge the notion that only Ivy League universities are capable of offering challenging courses and top-notch faculty. The CTCL metrics of what constitutes a great learning environment are more varied and interesting than the ones used by most college guidebooks and their effectiveness as a measure of quality education is evident in the results they produce. The member colleges also have resources for students who have learning disabilities. If you are planning to apply to a liberal arts college, their site will help you make a more informed decision about your path of education.


About the author:

Kristen Moon is an independent college counselor and founder of Moon Prep provides one-on-one tutoring services catered to university admissions. They guide students through the entire application process including: completing applications, personal statements, supplemental essays, student resumes, scholarships, and financial aid. Their specialty lies in the Ivy League, direct medical programs (BS/MD), and highly competitive universities.

How to Make a Good IELTS Prep Timeline This post originally appeared on the Magoosh IELTS blog.

An IELTS prep timeline shouldn’t be one-size-fits-all. After all, there are many IELTS test dates to choose from! There are benefits to making your own personal plan. Today, I’ll give you some tips on how you can make your own IELTS prep calendar.

Step 1: Figure how much study time you’ll need

Before you start to make your IELTS Prep timeline, take an IELTS practice test. Ideally, you should take an official IELTS practice exam, either from one of the official websites or one of the official IELTS books from Cambridge. If at all possible, you should also find a tutor or teacher to give you scoring and feedback for your IELTS Speaking and Writing.

Once you’ve got an IELTS practice test score (or maybe two practice test scores), compare your score to the score you actually need.

Basically, the farther you are from your target IELTS score, the more you’ll need to study. If you’re only half a band below your target score, you won’t need that much study time. However, if your score is too low by one band or more, you’ll need a longer IELTS prep timeline.

Step 2: Make a list of your strengths and weaknesses

When you look at your practice IELTS scores, it’s easy to just see the numbers. And it is important to look at your section scores, whole-test band, and the number of answers you missed. But these numbers don’t tell the whole story. You need to also look at the types of questions you’re missing. If you’re unsure what that means, review our complete IELTS guide for a breakdown of test sections and question types.

Maybe you’re weaker at multiple choice, or spelling, or perhaps you’re stronger in these or other areas. Your weak points tell you what you’ll need to spend a lot of time on during our study schedule; you may need to spend more time with vocabulary, or spelling, or essay writing, for exmaple. Your strengths represent opportunities to save time. If you’re already good at the IELTS Speaking interview, for example, you won’t need to devote much practice time to that (and if not, then check out this video for extra help!).

Step 3: Figure out how many hours of study you need

Once you’ve taken a practice exam and identified your strengths and weaknesses, you should do a little studying without a timeline (possibly a day or two of study). The idea here is to get a sense of your own IELTS studying style. Most importantly, you want to figure out how long it takes you to study a certain amount of practice material.

Based on the amount of material you cover in your first study session or two, estimate the total number of study hours you’ll need. How many hours will it take you to be truly IELTS-ready? Be sure to incorporate study tools like practice interview videos and practice for both IELTS Writing Tasks 1 and IELTS Writing Tasks 2. Once you’ve got that estimate, then look at how many hours you have for study time each week. This allows you to know how many weeks long your IELTS prep timeline should be.

Step 4: Make the actual IELTS Prep Timeline

So, now you know what you need to study and how long you should study. From there, you can make a full study plan. Your study plan can be weekly or daily. But remember to give yourself some flexibility. Some parts of your study plan may take longer than expected, while other parts may be completed more quickly than you originally planned. Be ready to make some changes to your IELTS study schedule as it progresses.

This final step can sometimes feel overwhelming. If you’re not sure where to start, check out some example IELTS prep plans.

About David Recine

David is a test prep expert at Magoosh. He has a Bachelor of Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a Masters in Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. He has been teaching K-12, University, and adult education classes since 2007 and has worked with students from every continent. Currently, David lives in a small town in the American Upper Midwest. When he’s not teaching or writing, David studies Korean, plays with his son, and takes road trips to Minneapolis to get a taste of city life.

Attack the SAT: What to do when your score plateaus By Allyson Evans

You’ve been studying for weeks and you’ve taken multiple practice SATs. You saw improvement on your first couple of practice tests and were feeling great! Then, you scored your most recent practice SAT and your score stayed the same (or even went down a little). What a bummer.


The good news is that you are not alone! At some point, almost all students see their SAT score plateau or even dip a little. So, take a deep breath, know that you’re not alone, and read the tips below to ensure your score starts going up again!  

Don’t give up.

You’re going to have ups and downs when you’re studying for the SAT. It’s inevitable. Some days, everything will just click and you’ll get more points than ever! Then, the very next day, you might miss ten questions in a row. That’s totally normal. The thing that’s going to get you ahead of the competition is your perseverance.


Take a day or two off to rest, and then get right back to your SAT study schedule. Follow your One Month SAT Study Plan to make sure you are covering all the topics you need to and in the right order.  While you might be tempted to deviate from the plan, now more than ever you need to stay on track. This SAT study plan was designed to help you learn everything you need to in time for the actual SAT when your score really matters.


Also, remember to keep your personal motivation in mind. For most students, that’s thinking about their dream colleges and the scores needed to get into those schools. If you’re not sure yet what your dream school is, check out the average NYU test scores or Georgia Tech scores to give you a sense of what some top schools want. Start by reviewing NYU Scores: What You Need to Get In and Georgia Tech SAT Scores, and then start thinking about the school that would be best for you!


Now that you’re back on track and holding your head up high, let’s look at a couple of specific steps you need to take to ensure your next practice SAT score is higher.

Analyze your SAT practice test results.

To keep making progress, you need to know exactly what’s working and what’s not working for you. The best way to determine what’s working is to set aside a few hours and review your most recent practice test or two. Go through all of the answers—right and wrong—to make sure you understand what you did for each question. Even for the questions you got right, you need to comprehend your approach so you can do it again next time.


For the questions you got wrong, take the time to understand why you got the questions wrong. Did you miss all the Algebra questions? Or did you miss the meaning of vocab questions? By noticing these patterns, you can start to see what you should focus on for the remainder of your study time. You don’t want to keep trying the same approach—now is the time to really hone in on your weaknesses and strengthen them! Find a solid SAT ebook, like the  Complete SAT Study Guide, and be sure you’ve reviewed all the best strategies and tactics for your weaker areas.


Also, if the pattern you’ve noticed is that you’re always short on time, the next tip will be crucial to raising your SAT score.

Pick up the pace.

To keep seeing your SAT score increase, you have to work through most, if not all, of the questions efficiently. It doesn’t matter how many times you can get a data interpretation question right if you have thirty minutes. You have to learn how to solve each question in the allotted time you are given. If your score has plateaued, you need to do some timed practice.


Set up your timer and try one section at a time in the allotted time. If you’re really struggling to get through all of the questions, keep an eye on the timer to help you remember how much time you have left. (Once you develop a good sense of the time you have for each question, you won’t need to look as often.) Remember to move on when you get really stuck on a problem, you don’t want to miss an easier question down the line because you got tripped up early on in the section. With a little timed practice, you’ll start to notice your efficiency increase and, no surprise, your SAT score, too!


When your SAT score plateaus, it can definitely be discouraging. Keep your chin up and stick to your study schedule. Once you’ve analyzed your strengths and weaknesses, spend a little time increasing your speed. If you do all of these things, your SAT score will start climbing back up in no time!



About the Author:


Allyson Evans earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and her JD from the University of Texas at Austin. She has been teaching and tutoring the LSAT since 2007, and loves helping students achieve their goals. She currently practices law in Austin, Texas. When she’s not helping students conquer the LSAT, she enjoys traveling and camping.